Posting for Profit: Open to the Social Media Savvy - FOX 42: Omaha News, Sports and Weather; kptm.com |

Posting for Profit: Open to the Social Media Savvy

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Zach Revense

 OMAHA (KPTM) – Online posting for pay used to be limited to bloggers. Now the market has opened up to every day social media users.

 

"My friends and family come to me for style inspiration and recommendations," said Amy Polletro.

 

Companies like beso.com give money to rewards customers like Polletro to post products she likes to her Facebook or Pinterest.

 

"As you share your finds… you share in our monetization engines," said beso.com employee, Elise Loehnen.  "You make money."

 

Beso.com is just one of a booming number of businesses compensating people to promote products.  Companies used to count on thousands of bloggers to post reviews or share links in order to earn commission.  Now any social media-savvy person can sign up and cash-in.

 

"In the first few weeks with the reward program I've made about $6.70," said Polletro.

 

It's possible to make a lot more.  With so many people swarming into this niche industry, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) makes a recommendation of its own.  Skim your friend's posts with caution.

 

"It's critical that readers understand that they're being paid," said Mary Engle of the FTC, "because you always want to know if there's any potential bias and you want to add that credibility or weight that you give that recommendation."

 

The FTC already has guidelines in place, but the bottom line is that any paid must be clearly identified.

 

Tip-offs come in the form of hashtags that look like #PAID or #SPON for sponsored.  Problems arise when consumers have no idea these laws exist.

 

"When you set up the links you don't have to let your friends know that you're getting paid for it," said Polletro." 

 

"I'm just an average person.  I'm not a super blogger.  I'm not a celebrity."

 

The FTC says otherwise, and it doesn't matter who you are.

 

"If you're being paid or compensated in some way to endorse or recommend a product no matter what the medium, what kind of site it is, there needs to be a disclosure."

 

Beso.com says that there's a blurred line between sharing pictures you choose and being hired to write a review.  Either way they say to use the hashtag.

ZACH REVENSE

 

OMAHA (KPTM) – Online posting for pay used to be limited to bloggers. Now the market has opened up to every day social media users.

 

"My friends and family come to me for style inspiration and recommendations," said Amy Polletro.

 

Companies like beso.com give money to rewards customers like Polletro to post products she likes to her Facebook or Pinterest.

 

"As you share your finds… you share in our monetization engines," said beso.com employee, Elise Loehnen.  "You make money."

 

Beso.com is just one of a booming number of businesses compensating people to promote products.  Companies used to count on thousands of bloggers to post reviews or share links in order to earn commission.  Now any social media-savvy person can sign up and cash-in.

 

"In the first few weeks with the reward program I've made about $6.70," said Polletro.

 

It's possible to make a lot more.  With so many people swarming into this niche industry, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) makes a recommendation of its own.  Skim your friend's posts with caution.

 

"It's critical that readers understand that they're being paid," said Mary Engle of the FTC, "because you always want to know if there's any potential bias and you want to add that credibility or weight that you give that recommendation."

 

The FTC already has guidelines in place, but the bottom line is that any paid must be clearly identified.

 

Tip-offs come in the form of hashtags that look like #PAID or #SPON for sponsored.  Problems arise when consumers have no idea these laws exist.

 

"When you set up the links you don't have to let your friends know that you're getting paid for it," said Polletro." 

 

"I'm just an average person.  I'm not a super blogger.  I'm not a celebrity."

 

The FTC says otherwise, and it doesn't matter who you are.

 

"If you're being paid or compensated in some way to endorse or recommend a product no matter what the medium, what kind of site it is, there needs to be a disclosure."

 

Beso.com says that there's a blurred line between sharing pictures you choose and being hired to write a review.  Either way they say to use the hashtag.

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